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COISIA : THE PASSING OF THE DINOSAURS

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    [NOM] => COISIA : THE PASSING OF THE DINOSAURS
    [PRODUIT] => 319001749
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    [COMMENTAIRE] => No, the dinosaurs weren’t mountaineers!
Let’s go back in time… to the Jurassic period, around 148 million years ago. Picture the scene: a warm and shallow sea, lagoons, sandbanks and silt, and low-lying islands with luxurious vegetation. And groups of dinosaurs walking in this soft ground, leaving their footprints behind them. The sun then dried out the soil, the sea covered the footprints with very fine sediment, followed by more drying from the sun, etc.: a combination of climatic circumstances froze this moment in time and preserved it for millions of years, so that we can now witness it.
The preservation of this event 140 million years ago provides scientists with information on past environments. It also reveals what the region was like in the Jurassic period. Much later, the upthrust of the Alps, caused by the collision between the African and Eurasian continental plates, led to the folding of the Jura mountain chain so that the layers of earth on which the dinosaurs walked are now practically vertical. First noticed by a child in the village and then recognised by Christian Gourrat from the Oyonnax Naturalists’ Society, the site is now being studied by the Palaeo-Environment and Palaeo-Biosphere Laboratory of the French National Centre for Scientific Research and the University of Lyon, under the leadership of Professor Pierre Hantzpergue.
Because of its outstanding features, the site has been registered under a French government scheme initiated by the Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy to create specially protected areas, with a view to eventually setting up a National Nature Reserve.
For more information on the work being carried out and the scientific data, visit www.lejurassique.com
    [DATMAJ] => 2018-04-24T11:05:52+00:00
    [DATECREATION] => 2018-01-08T17:13:16+00:00
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Site à pistes de dinosaures de Coisia
39240 COISIA

No, the dinosaurs weren’t mountaineers!
Let’s go back in time… to the Jurassic period, around 148 million years ago. Picture the scene: a warm and shallow sea, lagoons, sandbanks and silt, and low-lying islands with luxurious vegetation. And groups of dinosaurs walking in this soft ground, leaving their footprints behind them. The sun then dried out the soil, the sea covered the footprints with very fine sediment, followed by more drying from the sun, etc.: a combination of climatic circumstances froze this moment in time and preserved it for millions of years, so that we can now witness it.
The preservation of this event 140 million years ago provides scientists with information on past environments. It also reveals what the region was like in the Jurassic period. Much later, the upthrust of the Alps, caused by the collision between the African and Eurasian continental plates, led to the folding of the Jura mountain chain so that the layers of earth on which the dinosaurs walked are now practically vertical. First noticed by a child in the village and then recognised by Christian Gourrat from the Oyonnax Naturalists’ Society, the site is now being studied by the Palaeo-Environment and Palaeo-Biosphere Laboratory of the French National Centre for Scientific Research and the University of Lyon, under the leadership of Professor Pierre Hantzpergue.
Because of its outstanding features, the site has been registered under a French government scheme initiated by the Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy to create specially protected areas, with a view to eventually setting up a National Nature Reserve.
For more information on the work being carried out and the scientific data, visit www.lejurassique.com